Monday, January 26, 2015

IWC Schaffhausen Expands Its In-House Movements

Swiss watch manufacture IWC Schaffhausen is expanding its expertise in the design and manufacture of its own movements and will establish three new calibre families in the years ahead to complement its movements portfolio. These mechanisms will set new technical and aesthetic standards and underscore the Swiss luxury watch brand’s expertise as a developer and manufacturer of movements.
IWC Schaffhausen In House Movement Calibre 52010
The first of these movements to be launched is the 52000-calibre family, followed by automatic movements in the new 69000- and 42000-calibre families. The company’s aim is to further consolidate its in-house watchmaking expertise. The new movements developed and manufactured in Schaffhausen feature several technical improvements which, among other things, increase their accuracy. Apart from having new technical features, IWC’s calibres will undergo a design overhaul that will also enhance their aesthetic appeal.
IWC Schaffhausen In House Movement Calibre 52610 (front view)
On top of this, IWC is once again investing in its Schaffhausen home, the location of the company’s headquarters since 1868, with the construction of a new production and technology centre in the Merishausertal on the outskirts of the city. When IWC moves into the building in October 2016,  the entire case and parts manufacturing departments along with the movement assembly will be relocated to the new facility.
IWC Schaffhausen In House Movement Calibre 52610 (back view)
The newly designed in-house 52000-calibre family with bidirectional Pellaton winding has already been selected for use in four models in the 2015 Portugieser collection. The new movements are equipped with two barrels. They not only supply the watches with sufficient energy for a  7-day power reserve but also drive complications like the new annual calendar or the perpetual calendar. Another innovation in this particular movement is the material: the winding pawls and the automatic wheel are made of black ceramic while the rotor bearing is made of white ceramic – to be more precise, zirconium oxide. IWC Schaffhausen is one of few watch manufacturers worldwide to use these practically wear-free, high-tech materials for parts in the movement.
IWC Schaffhausen In House Movement Calibre 52615 (front view)
The indexless balance has an increased frequency of 4 hertz (28,800 beats per hour). Combined with the Breguet spring, bent into shape using traditional techniques, this guarantees maximum precision. Only very few watches worldwide have such a high oscillation rate together with a 7-day power reserve.
IWC Schaffhausen In House Movement Calibre 52615 ( back view)
The 52000-calibre family also sets new aesthetic standards. The design and finish of the movements in the new calibre family have undergone another upgrade. The proportions of the rotor and the inset “Probus Scafusia” medallion are noticeably more delicate. Together with the transparent sapphire-glass back, this provides a more open view of the technological features inside the watch.
IWC Schaffhausen In House Movement Calibre 52850 (front view)
In the perpetual calendar models, the rotors are made of solid 18-carat red gold and embellished with a “Probus Scafusia” relief engraving. These are complemented by blued screws, which for many watch connoisseurs are an indispensable characteristic of an exquisite in-house movement. The decoration with circular graining and Geneva stripes, the interplay of red jewels, blue screws and black ceramic elements with the red gold of the rotor: together, they convey the overall IWC  impression of quality appropriate for an in-house movement like this.
IWC Schaffhausen In House Movement Calibre 52850
Despite the elaborate ornamentation, the movements have retained all of their technical appeal. IWC Schaffhausen thus remains true to the engineering ethos established by company founder F. A. Jones when he introduced leading-edge production methods.

The overhauled calibre design is also to be incorporated into the new IWC 69000- and 42000-calibre families, which will now be gradually introduced. The new 69380-calibre chronograph movement is the rugged, high-performance drive that forms the cornerstone of the IWC 69000-calibre family. The chronograph is a classic column-wheel design and takes the energy it needs from a bidirectional pawl winding system similar to the Pellaton mechanism. The dial contains three subdials: for the hour counter at “9 o’clock”; for the minute counter at “12 o’clock”; and for the small seconds at “6 o’clock”. In contrast with many other chronograph movements, the counters at “6 o’clock” and  “9 o’clock” have swapped positions.

Apart from this, IWC Schaffhausen has plans to present the 42110 automatic movement from the new 42000-calibre family with a 42-hour power reserve. Like the 69380 calibre, this movement has a bidirectional pawl-winding system similar to the Pellaton mechanism which is known as a “cliquet magique”. The movements in the two new in-house 69000- and 42000-calibre families will be used primarily for IWC watches in the entry-level price segment.

NEW IN HOUSE MOVEMENTS
THE IWC 52000-CALIBRE FAMILY: The new 52000-calibre family marks the start of a new wave of in-house movements from IWC. The pawls and the automatic wheel are made of black ceramic, while the core of the rotor is made of white ceramic, which leads to almost zero abrasion. A state-of the-art balance with Breguet spring and two barrels guarantee an increased frequency of 4 hertz, ensuring a high rate of accuracy and long power reserve at the same time. The aesthetics have been enhanced through blued screws and a solid-gold rotor on high complications.

Featured in the following Portugieser timepieces:
THE IWC 42000-CALIBRE FAMILY: The new small Automatic base movement with a diameter of 27 millimeters has a power reserve of 42 hours and a bidirectional pawl-winding system similar to the Pellaton mechanism which is known as a “cliquet magique”. The very robust 42000 calibre with its frequency of 4 hertz will be used primarily for entry-level automatic watches in the IWC portfolio.

THE IWC 69000-CALIBRE FAMILY: The new small base movement 69000 calibre with a diameter of 30 millimeters will be introduced in entry-level chronograph watches. The dial contains three subdials: for the hour counter at “9 o’clock”; for the minute counter at “12 o’clock”; and for the small seconds at “6 o’clock”. It comes with a bi-directional pawl-winding system, a power reserve of 50 hours and a frequency of 4 hertz.

THE IWC 59000-CALIBRE FAMILY: The 59000 calibre convinces with its high frequency of 4 hertz and guarantees a high rate of accuracy and very long power reserve of up to 8 days. Functionalities such as the big date can be added to this movement thanks to IWC’s modular construction method.

Featured in the following Portugieser timepiece:
EXISTING MOVEMENTS
THE IWC 89000-CALIBRE FAMILY: The 89000 calibre with integrated mechanical chronograph including flyback function keeps its characteristic display with its hour and minute counters combined in one totalizer. The movement with its diameter of 30 millimeters has a power reserve of 68 hours and a frequency of 4 hertz. For all high complications, the movement is newly available with blued screws and a solid-gold rotor.

Featured in the following Portugieser timepieces:
THE IWC 50000-CALIBRE FAMILY: The 50000-calibre family represents a wide range of different movements that have one thing above all in common: their unmistakably large dimensions. The usage of the Pellaton winding system and a Breguet spring maximizes the precision. 1,960 complete revolutions of the rotor wind the movement for a full 7 days. For all high complications, the movement is newly available with blued screws and a solid-gold rotor.

Featured in the following Portugieser timepiece:
THE IWC 94000-CALIBRE FAMILY: The 94000 calibre is a hand-wound movement. It is powered by two barrels, which provide the higher torque to drive the constant-force tourbillon. Taking up almost a quarter of the entire bottom plate, the tourbillon is impressive for its sheer size alone. The two barrels of the 94900 calibre aligned in parallel guarantee a minimum of two days’ constant power. All this time, the seconds hand mounted on the titanium cage of the tourbillon advances in one-second intervals. Throughout the remaining time of the four-day power reserve, the tourbillon continues to run evenly, following the rhythm of the balance, which oscillates at the rate of 2.5 hertz, or 18,000 beats per hour.

Featured in the following Portugieser timepiece:
THE IWC 98000-CALIBRE FAMILY: The 98000-calibre hand-wound movement has been regularly enhanced for over 80 years. The movement includes an elongated index (the “F. A. Jones arrow”), which facilitates quick, easy adjustment of the spring length, and a three-quarter bridge decorated with Geneva stripes. The diameter measures 37.8 millimeters and the frequency is 2.5 hertz. The only exception is the movement used in the Portugieser Tourbillon Hand-Wound, which moves at 4 hertz.

Featured in the following Portugieser timepieces:
THE IWC 80000-CALIBRE FAMILY: The movements of the 80000-calibre family offer a maximum protection against abrasion and other defects. They are easily accessed for servicing and have been continuously improved in terms of reliability and shock absorption. Featuring an integrated shock absorption system that protects the rotor bearing, the precision of IWC timepieces is guaranteed even under extreme conditions.

No comments:

Post a Comment

Popular Posts

Blog Archive